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Topic: Vegetarian Diet and Running
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[Posted 8/28/2010 4:01:58 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[jacklynch]


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Lately I've been becoming more and more interested in a more vegetarian based diet but at the same time, being a high school runner, I'm still concerned with whether I'm getting enough protein. There are those who say that its very beneficial and skeptics who say its disastrous for the growing body. I don't know what to think and was hoping that i could get some advice on whether or how i should go about this.




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[Posted 8/28/2010 4:30:12 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Jesse the Hat]


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Check out the vegetarian area at Walmart or Kroger. Morning star makes some great meat substitutes.

http://www.morningstarfarms.com/products.aspx?coid=23&family=363

They have a good amount of protein. I only eat meat on the weekends or on holidays. There isn't really any reason to go full vegan unless you feel sorry for the animals or something. I have to admit that I feel a lot better without the meat because it takes longer to digest.

Peanut butter or Almond Butter, they have some protein.

Also, broccoli is like a miracle vegetable, they have a bit of everything in them.

And eat whole-grains.




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[Posted 8/28/2010 4:57:16 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[coulterclub]


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I've been vegetarian for 20 years and vegan for the last 8 or so... It's actually really easy to do. The primary thing is to make sure you are getting the same number of CALORIES that you did on a meat-based diet. There's protein in everything, vegetable-based or otherwise, so if you eat a well-balanced diet of 3000 calories per day (roughly what most young runners need), you'll get 75 grams of protein, which is perfect. Listen to your body though.... you might need more or less. Some great runner staples: bananas, peanut butter, potatoes, black beans, rice, (and beer once you turn 21). All excellent sources of protein, carbohydrates, and potassium... all cheap, too. Good luck!




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[Posted 8/28/2010 5:06:31 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[DJohnson]


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jacklynch wrote:


Lately I've been becoming more and more interested in a more vegetarian based diet but at the same time, being a high school runner, I'm still concerned with whether I'm getting enough protein. There are those who say that its very beneficial and skeptics who say its disastrous for the growing body. I don't know what to think and was hoping that i could get some advice on whether or how i should go about this.


Good for you. Like royal said, it really does make for easier running. Red meat doesn't digest well at all.

Carbs and vitamins/minerals are easily had in a vegetarian diet, but as for protein...eggs and fish, depending on your stance about fish and whether or not you want to eat them. Fish can be very healthy, and high-protein. Tuna is super-lean and maybe the best bet for someone who wants lean and easy animal protein. Eggs are an easy choice.


Do NOT turn to nuts for protein. First of all, they're incomplete proteins. Strike two, is that they're fatty. Almonds for example: for a 30 gram serving, there are 16 grams of fat, and only 6 grams of protein. You'd have to eat a quarter-pound of almonds just to get 24 grams of protein from them.

Protein supplements are the other route to go. Save up your lunch money and buy some protein powder if the eggs/fish isn't enough for you.

I eat meat about once a week, and I'm happy with training and muscle recovery through this diet.




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[Posted 8/28/2010 9:11:52 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[runningart]


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Not going to turn this into an anti-vegetarian rant but there are certain vitamins and minerals you simply CANNOT GET with a vegetarian diet unless fortified...mainly B12, you're also going to have trouble with Iron. With a vegetarian diet you are NEVER going to consume a complete protein, which means you stand the chance of not consuming enough Essetial Amino Acids if you are not diligent enough to track everything you eat and the amounts of amino acids in each meal. You are also going to have a problem with the bioavailability of the protein and minerals you are getting. So just because a source is high in content doesn't mean your body will absorb it.

Add to all this you are an athlete who has an excess need for various amino acids, vitamins and minerals....I think it's a big hassle.

Also, fish and egg are meat sources and if you're consuming fish and egg you're not really a vegatarian only a sub-type. In fact if you're consuming fish and eggs you'll have very little programs as you'll have a very good source of protein. Egg protein is the gold standard as far as protein bioavailability is concerned.

Also, don't be scared of fat. Nuts are great. Consuming fat doesn't necessary make you fat.

Alan

Alan




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[Posted 8/28/2010 11:33:40 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[coulterclub]


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Well, this above post is bulls**t, frankly. B-12, a bacteria found in organic soil, is readily available in animal products like eggs and dairy, and even if you choose a vegan diet, you get plenty if you eat locally grown, organic vegetables. I get most of my veggies from my garden, take NO supplements, and have never been diagnosed with any sort of deficiency. Also, tons of products, particularly cereals and soy/almond milks are fortified with B-12. Don't sweat that one. Your body doesn't need much of it anyway, and it stores it for a long time. The "complete protein" thing is wrong, too. Quinoa, for instance is the perfect protein with all essential amino acids... As long as you eat a balanced, varied diet, you'll be fine.... just ask Scott Jurek, Carl Lewis, Edwin Moses, etc. As far as iron goes? Eat lots of leafy greens and beans. No problem there.

Most of the anti- veg athlete crowd has either never tried it, or they've tried it briefly, didn't really know what they were doing, and chalked up their failure to the diet itself, rather than their own mistakes. As I said, I've been vegetarian for 20 years, vegan for 8.... have competed from 400 meters through the marathon... currently train about 80 miles a week as I get ready to turn 40 next year and compete as a master. Haven't been knocked-down sick since 1995, and have only missed 2 training days this year (not due to injury). Don't listen to people who say it can't be done. It can. It's easy. And the overall health, environmental, and ethical benefits are hard to argue against. http://www.goveg.com is a good resource to check out.




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[Posted 8/29/2010 2:08:25 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Jesse the Hat]


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Anyone know what you call a Kenyan taking a dump..... A show off.




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[Posted 8/29/2010 2:38:11 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[cuddlemuffinn]


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I agree with coulterclub. Most of the skeptics are to quick to judge it. I'm a college runner and have been a vegetarian off/on for over a year and a strict one for the past 5 months and I don't think I've ever functioned this efficiently ever. Once you get into the groove of things, eating right falls into place.




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[Posted 8/29/2010 9:45:03 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[dumblondie3294]


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I have been a vegetarian for half a year now and I think it's great. My running has improved dramatically as well as digestion. There are plenty of ways to still get the protein and vitamins you need without eating animal flesh. Go to GMC and ask what kind of vegetarian supplements they carry. Protein can be easily abtained by eggs, dairy, beans, whole grains, and protein powder. All of these are pretty cheap. You can get a jug of protein powder at Wal-mart for under $20, and that usually lasts me several months. I like that stuff a lot because it is easy to prepare, and you can make great smoothies. You can also buy a vegetarian cookbook, which has recipies that make a complete protein. If you mix a dairy, a legume (beans, peanuts), and a whole grain it makes a complete protein. And of course there are plenty of fake meat products that are packed with protein and taste great, and you just have to pop them in the microwave. So yeah it's pretty easy to be a vegetarian. It makes the body feel great, and of course it is ethically sound. Hope this helped!




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[Posted 8/29/2010 10:03:31 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[rwilliams]


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everyone else seems to have covered the whole "getting enough protein" aspect of this, so i'm just going to touch on the "disastrous for the growing body" part. i turned vegetarian at age 6, am about to turn 17, have not had a piece of meat in 11 years, and i am just as healthy if not healthier than all of my peers. i am of normal height and weight, have extremely high protein and iron, and am rarely sick. it certainly has not hindered me.

everyone acts like it's such a huge deal to turn vegetarian- and maybe this is just because i've done it my whole life so it's the only way i know- but i never have cravings for meats or really wish i could order some huge carnivorous meal off the menu. it's easy. good luck.




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[Posted 8/29/2010 10:44:45 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[runningart]


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I'm not saying it can't be done. I'm not saying it's healthy or unhealthy. Our ancestors, if they couldn't find and catch game on a daily basis, were de facto vegans until they found something and killed it. We are omnivores and adaptable.

I'm just saying it's a very contrived and overly difficult way to eat ESPECIALLY for the increased needs of an athlete. However, the vegan or vegetarian lifestyle is definetly healthier than the usual overly processed way most Americans eat. It's like you're going from one extreme to the other.

I also have issues with what people call vegetarian. If you're eating eggs don't talk to me because you're still eating meat whether you like to believe it or not. If you're eating fish, you're not a vegetarian.

Hell, there's even been vegan BODYBUILDERS!

To each his own. I'm going to go have a nice rare bloody steak right now. Yummy!!!!!

Alan




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[Posted 8/29/2010 12:31:06 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[isitsafe?]


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coulterclub wrote:


Well, this above post is bulls**t, frankly. B-12, a bacteria found in organic soil, is readily available in animal products like eggs and dairy, and even if you choose a vegan diet, you get plenty if you eat locally grown, organic vegetables. I get most of my veggies from my garden, take NO supplements, and have never been diagnosed with any sort of deficiency. Also, tons of products, particularly cereals and soy/almond milks are fortified with B-12. Don't sweat that one. Your body doesn't need much of it anyway, and it stores it for a long time. The "complete protein" thing is wrong, too. Quinoa, for instance is the perfect protein with all essential amino acids... As long as you eat a balanced, varied diet, you'll be fine.... just ask Scott Jurek, Carl Lewis, Edwin Moses, etc. As far as iron goes? Eat lots of leafy greens and beans. No problem there.

Most of the anti- veg athlete crowd has either never tried it, or they've tried it briefly, didn't really know what they were doing, and chalked up their failure to the diet itself, rather than their own mistakes. As I said, I've been vegetarian for 20 years, vegan for 8.... have competed from 400 meters through the marathon... currently train about 80 miles a week as I get ready to turn 40 next year and compete as a master. Haven't been knocked-down sick since 1995, and have only missed 2 training days this year (not due to injury). Don't listen to people who say it can't be done. It can. It's easy. And the overall health, environmental, and ethical benefits are hard to argue against. www.goveg.com is a good resource to check out.


First of all, nobody comes on this site and says anything runningart says is bulls**t. He is a great American, and he just joined the Army. He never said you can't get what you need eating a vegan/vegetarian diet, or whatever the hell it's called now. He just said it isn't easy. I think a lot of people would agree. God bless you and your organic and home grown vegetables, but that's not really going to work real well for most people that live in an area that has four seasons. I tried planting spinach in my backyard one November a few years back, and when I went to harvest it in March there was nothing there. Maybe the two foot blanket of snow it sat under all winter had something to do with it. In most areas of this country that aren't near a larger urban center, you're about a three hour drive from the nearest organically grown vegetable (not counting the organically grown "medicinal marijuana" greenhouses that have sprung up in states like mine that have legalized it).

Seriously, I kind of envy people like you that put the time and effort into their diet, it's very important to you obviously. I do my best to eat well, but you know what, sometimes on a Saturday morning I just can't live without a sausage Mcmuffin with egg. If that makes me a bad person, so be it. They taste damn good.




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[Posted 8/29/2010 4:10:38 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[coulterclub]


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Eh... not to foster a semantic debate, but why would someone's chosen profession render them infallible? Joining the army or being a "great American" doesn't give you a strangle hold on the truth. Sorry.




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[Posted 8/29/2010 4:20:31 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Jesse the Hat]


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coulterclub wrote:


Eh... not to foster a semantic debate, but why would someone's chosen profession render them infallible? Joining the army or being a "great American" doesn't give you a strangle hold on the truth. Sorry.


you're probably right. This is where his college degree come into play.




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[Posted 8/29/2010 4:39:22 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Ayedubbs]


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All science aside, I'm going to give the best advice to a 16yr old that I can give. You have heard the good and the bad about both sides. But, who controls your diet right now? At your age, do you have enough control over the food readily avaliable to you to make the decision to become vegitarian/vegan. I'm not saying you don't, but you need to consider if you do.

Getting enough of everything you need is difficult whether you chose to eat a lot of meat, no meat, or some meat, and if you have limited control over your diet, I can only imagine that's even more difficult.

I say that you can reasonable make the decision to do either...many runners and athletes are successful meateaters, others sucessful non-meateaters, but do you have the resources to restrict your diet further than it already is restricted? What I mean is..

1. is anyone in your family/household a vegan/vegitarian?
2. are your parents/gaurdians going to be willing to work with you to have different foods avaliable for you that are rich in the nutrients/minerals you will be losing by cutting meat out of your diet?
3. is your school vegitarian friendly as far as lunches go?
4. Do you prepare your own lunch or does someone do it for you? If it's not vegitarian friendly, are you willing to pack and prepare your own lunches?
5. Do you go grocery shopping or does someone else? Is that person going to be willing to buy other things that you will need should you chose to make this decision?

I'm not saying the answer to all this is no, but ask yourself these questions.

The reason I say this is bc I have known a handful of friends/athletes that went vegitarian in HS and they would jsut say "Oh, don't make me meat" or "ill eat dinner, but just not with the meat" -- you can't just cut out one thing and expect that you'll be okay.

Maybe you do have the means to support this decision, or maybe you cook all your own meals and buy the food or ask whoever does, to buy those things for you, and thus, i commend you for that. But if you do not, you should talk with those people who may or may not be indirectly chosing your diet for you.

Also, just bc you don't have the means to go vegetarian now, doesn't mean you won't have the means in the near future.

Do your own research there is a lot of good stuff out there.

That is all.

love love
mwah x 2




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[Posted 8/29/2010 7:16:52 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[mr]


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I just feel I need to point out that B12 is a vitamin, not a bacteria. Also, vitamin B12 found in plants is likely not available to humans after consumption and you will not "get plenty if you eat locally grown, organic vegetables."




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[Posted 8/29/2010 7:38:10 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[coulterclub]


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It's FOUND in bacteria in organic soil. The jury is still officially out on the question of whether or not humans can synthesize soil-based b-12, but unofficially, in light of the huge number of healthy vegans, it's obvious that we're getting it from somewhere. Since I don't take any supplements, I'm either getting it from fortified Almond milk, clif bars, or my homegrown veggies. In either case, I've never been diagnosed with any deficiencies, so I'm inclined to believe that the B12 question is more of an unfounded scare tactic by the anti-veg crowd.




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[Posted 8/29/2010 8:05:04 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Jesse the Hat]


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I took these from wikipedia:

"As the largest and most structurally complicated vitamin, it can be produced industrially only through bacterial fermentation-synthesis."
&
"Biosynthesis of the basic structure of the vitamin in nature is only accomplished by simple organisms such as some bacteria and algae,"
&
"Ultimately, animals must obtain vitamin B12 directly or indirectly from bacteria, and these bacteria may inhabit a section of the gut which is posterior to the section where B12 is absorbed. Thus, herbivorous animals must either obtain B12 from bacteria in their rumens, or (if fermenting plant material in the hindgut) by reingestion of cecotrope fces."
&
"Vitamin B12 is found in foods that come from animals, including fish and shellfish, meat (especially liver), poultry, eggs, milk, and milk products."

Now you Know, you Michiganite.




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[Posted 8/29/2010 8:55:03 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[routledc]


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[Posted 8/29/2010 10:53:30 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[mr]


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I know it is found in bacteria, but that is not what you originally wrote: I was clarifying. I'm not going to argue that you aren't getting enough B12, but I am going to guess it's coming from your fortified milk and clif bars, not the vegetables. It's not only the anti-veg crowd giving notice of the need to find different sources of B12, many vegan websites make the same claim for the need.




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[Posted 8/29/2010 11:01:00 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[mr]


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What are you trying to point out here?

ps you used the wrong demonym




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[Posted 8/30/2010 10:18:15 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[DJohnson]


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Ayedubbs wrote:


All science aside, I'm going to give the best advice to a 16yr old that I can give. You have heard the good and the bad about both sides. But, who controls your diet right now? At your age, do you have enough control over the food readily avaliable to you to make the decision to become vegitarian/vegan. I'm not saying you don't, but you need to consider if you do.

Getting enough of everything you need is difficult whether you chose to eat a lot of meat, no meat, or some meat, and if you have limited control over your diet, I can only imagine that's even more difficult.

I say that you can reasonable make the decision to do either...many runners and athletes are successful meateaters, others sucessful non-meateaters, but do you have the resources to restrict your diet further than it already is restricted? What I mean is..

1. is anyone in your family/household a vegan/vegitarian?
2. are your parents/gaurdians going to be willing to work with you to have different foods avaliable for you that are rich in the nutrients/minerals you will be losing by cutting meat out of your diet?
3. is your school vegitarian friendly as far as lunches go?
4. Do you prepare your own lunch or does someone do it for you? If it's not vegitarian friendly, are you willing to pack and prepare your own lunches?
5. Do you go grocery shopping or does someone else? Is that person going to be willing to buy other things that you will need should you chose to make this decision?

I'm not saying the answer to all this is no, but ask yourself these questions.

The reason I say this is bc I have known a handful of friends/athletes that went vegitarian in HS and they would jsut say "Oh, don't make me meat" or "ill eat dinner, but just not with the meat" -- you can't just cut out one thing and expect that you'll be okay.

Maybe you do have the means to support this decision, or maybe you cook all your own meals and buy the food or ask whoever does, to buy those things for you, and thus, i commend you for that. But if you do not, you should talk with those people who may or may not be indirectly chosing your diet for you.

Also, just bc you don't have the means to go vegetarian now, doesn't mean you won't have the means in the near future.

Do your own research there is a lot of good stuff out there.

That is all.

love love
mwah x 2


That is excellent advice. For example, protein supplements are expensive!! It's also rude to cut out from family dinner, no matter what the reason. If you had some illness or allergy it'd be understood by your parents, but it is just rude to expect special accommodations from other people, unless you're paying them lots. How much do you pay your parents to cook for you, jacklynch?

I've always been anal about diet, even when in HS. After having grown up, and into my last year of college, I still am. But after experiencing a wide variety of social eating experiences, from backyard barbecues to formal banquets, I've learned to bite the bullet when food is provided by others. Eat what everyone else is eating if you're in a social setting. You're probably not special enough to merit special accommodations.




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[Posted 8/30/2010 10:31:54 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[DJohnson]


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runningart wrote:


Not going to turn this into an anti-vegetarian rant but there are certain vitamins and minerals you simply CANNOT GET with a vegetarian diet unless fortified...mainly B12, you're also going to have trouble with Iron. With a vegetarian diet you are NEVER going to consume a complete protein, which means you stand the chance of not consuming enough Essetial Amino Acids if you are not diligent enough to track everything you eat and the amounts of amino acids in each meal. You are also going to have a problem with the bioavailability of the protein and minerals you are getting. So just because a source is high in content doesn't mean your body will absorb it.

Add to all this you are an athlete who has an excess need for various amino acids, vitamins and minerals....I think it's a big hassle.

Also, fish and egg are meat sources and if you're consuming fish and egg you're not really a vegatarian only a sub-type. In fact if you're consuming fish and eggs you'll have very little programs as you'll have a very good source of protein. Egg protein is the gold standard as far as protein bioavailability is concerned.

Also, don't be scared of fat. Nuts are great. Consuming fat doesn't necessary make you fat.

Alan

Alan


True, someone who eats fish and eggs isn't a very good vegetarian. But there are those borderline types of vegetarians, who have a problem only with eating sentient beings. Well, eggs aren't sentient, yet. And some type of shellfish don't have a central nervous system...or something like that. It's really splitting hairs, but it's hard to blame 'em considering how restricted their protein sources are.

Nuts are tasty and crunchy, but a terrible source of protein for an athlete. Screw the labels on the packaging, that say "excellent source of protein!!" Like someone mentioned earlier, they aren't complete proteins. But let's say they were: It takes eating LOTS of nuts to make serious progress towards 100-150 grams of protein daily.

The basic nut point I'm trying to make is that anything that is composed of %75 fat (nuts) is a very poor choice for supplying a much-needed nutrient like protein.




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[Posted 8/30/2010 10:22:45 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[jacklynch]


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Wow! I just checked my post and am psyched to see so much feedback. I wasn't expecting many people to respond so this is awesome. I'll definitely take all of your advice to heart. Thanks so much to everyone for helping me make this so much easier. I really appreciate the support.




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[Posted 8/31/2010 8:10:35 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[dec622]


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Jim Fixx stated that there are many diets for running and the only one worth mentioning is vegetarian. That was in the late 70's.

My daughter is a vegetarian and I worried about protien at first. I found that protien can be sourced in many ways. See the replys above.

Do what feels right for you.




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[Posted 8/31/2010 10:59:57 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[jmclenn1]


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more steak for me, losers




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[Posted 9/1/2010 6:39:24 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[corcoran96]


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okay I know everyone is being all specific and critical, but I have a been high school xc runner and vegetarian for over a year and a half. No one else in my family is a vegetarian, and I have only seen an improvement in my health. You may consider cutting down in steps i.e. red meat, meat, fish. Thats what I did and I eat lots of other proteins. It's totally healthy. And I've not had any problems.




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[Posted 9/1/2010 7:19:28 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[ccsoar4031]


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My only advice is that if you're going to go vegetarian, make sure you do it right. Like Aydee said, some people decide to go vegetarian and just "cut out the meat", which is not particularly healthy. People who are on vegetarian diets tend to be healthier than their meat-eating counterparts (in part b/c these people tend to live healthier lifestyles in general, not necessarily b/c of the lack of meat), but the major caveat is that you have to be more cognizant of what nutrients you're taking in, or else you risk deficiencies. Protein, iron and vitamin B12 are the major ones that can be problematic if you don't know what you're doing, and these are key for runners. Variety is important, and make sure you're maintaining a balance of carbs and fats in your diet (there's debate, but usually 70/30 in favor of carbs is supposed to be a good balance for runners). Since you're a high schooler, I'd definitely talk it over with your parents and maybe go to a dietician to make sure you know what foods will give you the nutrients you need as a developing teenager and runner, and also that your parents are willing to accommodate your dietary needs.




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[Posted 9/1/2010 10:07:17 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[RyanMiller]


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One of the best things you can do is to start getting some objective health markers, learn what they mean, learn what the optimal levels are, and monitor them on a regular basis.

Example: you have one guy telling you it's hard to get B12 without eating meat. Another guy is saying he hasn't had any problems with B12 because he's been eating veggies from his garden.

Instead of thinking "I'm going to believe this guy or the other guy because what they say resonates with me"...get a B12 test done, learn what the optimal levels are, compare them to your current levels and go from there. Also, realize that just because your levels are good now, doesn't mean they can't change.

Really, it's just like running. Either you have objective results or you don't. I've had people tell me their theories about training, what I should or should not be doing with my training, blah blah blah...the only problem is, they have NO RESULTS to back up what they are saying.

Another point - There are health concerns no matter what you eat. It's just the nature of the game. It's foolish to assume just because you eat meat you will be healthy. Or just because you don't eat meat you will be healthy. This is why it's important to get tested and also educate yourself on what the tests mean. Most doctors will just tell you whether or not you have a disease. They will not tell you what to do to obtain optimal health, which as a runner, should be of primary concern to you.




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[Posted 9/2/2010 8:37:40 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[BrewPat]


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I get all the B12 I need from beer. Hooray beer!




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[Posted 9/2/2010 12:15:24 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[isitsafe?]


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RyanMiller wrote:


One of the best things you can do is to start getting some objective health markers, learn what they mean, learn what the optimal levels are, and monitor them on a regular basis.

Example: you have one guy telling you it's hard to get B12 without eating meat. Another guy is saying he hasn't had any problems with B12 because he's been eating veggies from his garden.

Instead of thinking "I'm going to believe this guy or the other guy because what they say resonates with me"...get a B12 test done, learn what the optimal levels are, compare them to your current levels and go from there. Also, realize that just because your levels are good now, doesn't mean they can't change.

Really, it's just like running. Either you have objective results or you don't. I've had people tell me their theories about training, what I should or should not be doing with my training, blah blah blah...the only problem is, they have NO RESULTS to back up what they are saying.

Another point - There are health concerns no matter what you eat. It's just the nature of the game. It's foolish to assume just because you eat meat you will be healthy. Or just because you don't eat meat you will be healthy. This is why it's important to get tested and also educate yourself on what the tests mean. Most doctors will just tell you whether or not you have a disease. They will not tell you what to do to obtain optimal health, which as a runner, should be of primary concern to you.


You make too much sense. Why are you on this site?




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[Posted 9/2/2010 3:58:35 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Jesse the Hat]


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Without meat:
Photobucket

With meat:
Photobucket


...nuff said




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[Posted 9/27/2010 9:43:54 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Mdaws749]


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jacklynch wrote:


Lately I've been becoming more and more interested in a more vegetarian based diet but at the same time, being a high school runner, I'm still concerned with whether I'm getting enough protein. There are those who say that its very beneficial and skeptics who say its disastrous for the growing body. I don't know what to think and was hoping that i could get some advice on whether or how i should go about this.


it is challenging for any vegetarian to get the daily recommended amount of all 8 essential amino acids from a vegetarian diet WITHOUT supplementing and while staying within their daily calorie count. yes you can do food combinations that will get you all eight... but you will more than likely be too full to get all of recommended amount. so its more economical to reach your goals through eating a modest amount of meat. (don't over do the protein, either... that can be pretty bad. any that you don't use your body will store as fat)




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[Posted 9/27/2010 9:49:03 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Mdaws749]


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vitamin B-12 is water soluble. you pee it out on a regular basis and your body does not store it for a long time. we only store vitamins A, D, E & K. All B's and C's get pee'd out




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[Posted 4/12/2011 9:22:55 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[rniemi]


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runningart wrote:


Not going to turn this into an anti-vegetarian rant but there are certain vitamins and minerals you simply CANNOT GET with a vegetarian diet unless fortified...mainly B12, you're also going to have trouble with Iron. With a vegetarian diet you are NEVER going to consume a complete protein, which means you stand the chance of not consuming enough Essetial Amino Acids if you are not diligent enough to track everything you eat and the amounts of amino acids in each meal. You are also going to have a problem with the bioavailability of the protein and minerals you are getting. So just because a source is high in content doesn't mean your body will absorb it.

Add to all this you are an athlete who has an excess need for various amino acids, vitamins and minerals....I think it's a big hassle.

Also, fish and egg are meat sources and if you're consuming fish and egg you're not really a vegatarian only a sub-type. In fact if you're consuming fish and eggs you'll have very little programs as you'll have a very good source of protein. Egg protein is the gold standard as far as protein bioavailability is concerned.

Also, don't be scared of fat. Nuts are great. Consuming fat doesn't necessary make you fat.

Alan

Alan


Check out quinoa, it's a complete protein and a grain product :)

Super easy to make, lots of fun to eat. You can eat it like rice or oatmeal.



There are two types of iron - plant based and meat based. So although you CAN get iron from plants, it is harder for your body to digest. I take an iron supplement and a B vitamin to make sure I get it all.

I am new vegetarian and I run for a D1 college- there are 3 others on my team of 8 who are vegetarians and we all love it. Our times have dropped tremendously this year, our blood work is better, we feel healthy, our skin and hair are healthier. And we all became vegetarians in July.



I also dropped cow milk and drink Soy and Almond milk. These are often fortified with extra calcium and vit D. I have a couple protein shakes for breakfast a couple times a week.



I know that protein is really important, and I love it, but remember that we as Americans eat more than necessary. I just read somewhere that we should be eating about 5.5 oz and we eat over 8 every day. Just something to think about!



Hope that helped. I'm a nursing major and am getting my master's in nutrition hopefully so I love talking about this stuff!




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[Posted 4/12/2011 10:32:34 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[spidermonkey21]


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I would evaluate the reason why you want to become a vegetarian. If it's for moral reasons (e.g. against factory farming, etc.) then perhaps for you it's best for you to eliminate meat from your diet. But if it's for health reasons, I would encourage you to still incorporate some meat into your diet for reasons runningart and Mdaws749 mentioned.



I would strongly recommend eating as many fruits and vegetables as you can, and eating less meat than what is typical in the usual American diet. A good rule of thumb is your plate should be half fruits and vegetables, one quarter protein (not necessarily meat protein), and one quarter carbs. There are tremendous health benefits (short and long term) to eating more fruits and vegetables...I could give a huge laundry list if you would like.



 I also think it is important to note that some people have an easier time being a vegetarian than others because of differences in and individual's physiology or intensity/volume of their exercise regimen. So when people tell you that being a vegetarian is "easy," it doesn't necessary mean being a vegetarian will be easy for you, or be what's right for you. I know some athletes that are vegetarians that do just fine, but I also know some people who tried it and had health problems and/or nutrient deficiencies (iron being very common due to plant iron being difficult to absorb). If you do decide to become a vegetarian, I would consult a nutritionist to help you with your diet, especially since you are in your growing teen years.




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[Posted 4/12/2011 11:03:39 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Alex_Papa]


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1. yes

2. coulterclub hit the ball out of the park

3. Something interesting that I've been thinking about recently: so, it's (a) been shown that vegetarians commonly have identifiably more alkaline blood than meat eaters (it has something to do with how a bunch of plants interact once they enter our body)... and since (b) obviously we all know that a certain amount of lactic acid buildup in your muscles during intense physical activity causes a reduced pH and your muscles to slow production (thus slowing pace) until the acid is cleared... and (c) alkaline things have a better ability to buffer against free H+ ions in solution (or blood, in this case)... could one make the conclusion that (d) a vegetarian diet consequently helps buffer lactic acid better during something like intervals and thus increase performance? 




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[Posted 4/12/2011 11:55:34 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[spidermonkey21]


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That's a really interesting idea. I am not really sure but I have some thoughts:



1) Lactic acid does cause pain in muscles (that burning feeling we are all familiar with), so buffering the acid may reduce that burning pain when we cross into anaerobic territory.



2) However, you would have to consider that clearing lactic acid may not necessarily make muscles more resistant to fatigue. An example that comes to mind is when you are in good shape for anaerobic activities (e.g. weight lifting, 400/800 M races), you don't "feel the burn" quite as much as you would when you first started training, but your muscles still fatigue.



3) It is likely that the ability to stay within aerobic respiration is more the limiting factor for performance than ability to buffer lactic acid. If you can run fast but stay aerobic (which is what well trained distance runners are able to do), there won't be much lactic acid production in the first place.



I think I am going to look into that more when I find time, because that is a really interesting idea!




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[Posted 4/13/2011 11:00:34 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[marylandexc]


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Back when I was in high school, we ate meat.



There were very few vegetarians and I don't know if veganism or raw foodies even existed.



And if they did, they got they a** whooped in school for being freaks and geeks.




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[Posted 4/13/2011 11:37:04 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Rain Runner]


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Emergen-C has 10 mg of vitamin B12 which is 500% of what you need daily, so it says. Best wishes!




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[Posted 4/14/2011 9:04:57 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Jesse the Hat]


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My plug in baby, 
Crucifies my enemies,
When I'm tired of giving




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[Posted 4/14/2011 9:35:04 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[akxrunner90]


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I was a vegetarian for a year, then switched to veganism for roughly five years. I've slowly started adding in dairy products in the past year. I've also just started eating chicken again which has seemed to help me personally, because I was having trouble finding other forms of protein while away at school. However, I didn't have too many running issues as a vegan/vegetarian in high school; it never seemed to be the cause of any running problems I have had. As long as you do some research on some of the different options you have for protein and other important nutrients, and understand which nutrients/vitamins you need and know what you may have trouble getting without meat you should be okay. Some people's bodies do okay without meat, some people need it. It's just important to make sure you are eating the right foods, instead of just focusing on eliminating the meat. The first few years I stopped eating meat I made sure I was taking iron supplements, and B-12 vitamins to supplement for what I was losing from not eating meat. I mainly started eating meat, dairy and eggs just because it was easier to get protein, calcium etc. that way. But when I wasn't eating meat, my body did feel better in some ways, and I was able to digest foods such as beans, veggies, fruits etc much easier than I did any meat or some dairy products. Though I've started eating chicken again a few times a week, I still try to mainly follow a vegetarian diet. If you know what vegetarian options are out there, and know what your body needs to run your best, being a vegetarian can be a very healthy option! Hope that helps a little bit. 




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[Posted 4/14/2011 10:34:32 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[marylandexc]


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If loving you is wrong, I don't want to be right.



And girl you look all kinds of right, looks like being vegan didn't do you wrong. 




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[Posted 4/15/2011 10:01:38 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[cmomrunfast]


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marylandexc wrote:


If loving you is wrong, I don't want to be right.



And girl you look all kinds of right, looks like being vegan didn't do you wrong. 


Thanks!



I luv everyone on running2win! I love today also because it was sunny. Okay, bye!



cclark1121




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[Posted 7/19/2011 8:31:03 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[mymotherisafish]


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jacklynch wrote:


Lately I've been becoming more and more interested in a more vegetarian based diet but at the same time, being a high school runner, I'm still concerned with whether I'm getting enough protein. There are those who say that its very beneficial and skeptics who say its disastrous for the growing body. I don't know what to think and was hoping that i could get some advice on whether or how i should go about this.



I have been a vegan for several years. I've found it conducive to running and overall health. The most frequent question I'm asked concerning my diet is your same concern- sufficient protein. As has been stated repeatedly, there is protein in most all foods you eat. It requires some planning ahead, especially with the limitations of high school cafeterias (if that's what you rely on). Fortunately, there is now a plethora of vegetarian protein sources available at your average grocery store- let alone specialty stores such as Whole Foods. Give it a shot, see how you feel! It's not as demanding as it may seem, really just try to mix up the veggies you eat, balance starchy carbs with your leafy greens, always eat bright colored fruits and vegetables, and make sure you eat a lot! It can be fun to tap into your creative side with meals, too. I think you'll find everything in your body will run more smoothly with more consistent energy levels. Good luck!




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[Posted 7/20/2011 4:08:56 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Love Daisies]


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I have been moving my family towards a complete vegetarian diet for a couple years now.  I have small children and have been very diligent in making sure they receive all the vitamins and minerals needed.  As stated above, there are multiple sources of complete proteins--quinoa being a favorite in our house.  Amaranth is another good source.  Avocado is another good source of protein--not as high as other sources, but higher than most other fruits.  Variety really is the key.  Our reasons for moving to a vegetarian life-style are completely health related, so it has been top priority to make sure we are getting a well-rounded diet.




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[Posted 8/6/2013 7:21:16 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Ahersh93]


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Please Please Please do not do this. I have nothing against the vegetarian diet, as i myself tried in for a full year. My findings were that how i felt look a little bit like the second half of a bell curve. started out really really good and just went to crap from there. As a high school runner, your body is still developing and nutrition is vital. Iron found in animal products cannot be matched and is much easier for the body to absorb than plant iron.  You could dabble with eating LESS meat at least at first to see if you feel the changes, but i would not reccomend the vegetarian way just yet.




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[Posted 8/7/2013 2:51:54 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[stopcecil!]


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It will work. Make sure you eat lots of greens for iron and make sure get complete protein.




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[Posted 8/7/2013 2:56:41 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[stopcecil!]


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Saying you can't get complete protein is completely wrong. Traditional mexican cuisine is vegetarian and they get complete protein from a combination of rice, beans, and corn. Iron can be drawn from green veggies and the absorption of iron can be enhanced by Vit C.




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[Posted 8/7/2013 4:27:11 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[mikey_the_kid]


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I grew up just fine on an all vegetarian diet. 



I am still vegetarian today. 




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[Posted 8/8/2013 12:56:06 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Trembo3578]


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I don't think I'll ever understand the vegetarian way of life. There are so many different kinds of meat that taste good and many forms of them are completely healthy. Oh well, more meat for me.



Also, I try to eat at least my body weight in grams of protein per day...so this "there is a little protein in everything" concept doesn't work very well for me.




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[Posted 8/8/2013 1:41:29 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[oyster.dome]


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I am of the opinion that the food pyramid is upside down.  We should be eating mostly fruits and vegetables.  In the past there have been two main camps -- more carbs or more protein.  Over this past year I have been focusing on increasing plant food, reducing animal products and especially reducing any kind of processed food.  I have been feeling a lot better.  My weight has dropped 25 lbs this year and I am achieving 40 + PR's frequently.



The one thing I would like to make a point about.  Why do people feel so inclined to do these diets to the 100% level.  We have been eating animal products for 1000s of years.  It does not seem reasonable to me to think that there isn't any benefit.  Instead of completely cutting out things from your diet that you enjoy why not just reduce them down to specific occasions.  Most people would agree that drinking soda pop is not something good for you.  But if you really like having a soda pop once in a while why not just save for after a PR.  Probably the majority of people in the past could not afford to eat meat to the levels Americans do today.  That's why we end up with festivals and celebrations.  Many people just lived a subsistence diet and would look forward to coming festivals so they could really pig out.  Today people pig out everyday and then pigout even more when a celebration comes.



I'm just not sure that we need to take everything to the extreme.



Just my three cents.




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[Posted 8/10/2013 12:10:39 AM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[Coleman]


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Meat is good, McDonalds is excellent.




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[Posted 8/17/2013 3:25:22 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[runningart]


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Holy 2 year bump BATMAN!! Where's DOC BROWN MARTY!!!

 

 Alan





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[Posted 8/17/2013 9:57:03 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[isitsafe?]


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runningart wrote:


Holy 2 year bump BATMAN!! Where's DOC BROWN MARTY!!!

 

 Alan



What, did someone hack runningart's account and log in as him and make a post?




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[Posted 8/19/2013 4:36:39 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[NicoleRose82]


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Read "Eat and Run" by Scott Jurek.




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[Posted 8/21/2013 1:35:24 PM]  Vegetarian Diet and Running

[PeytonH]


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How can you tell which person is a vegetarian at a dinner table? Don't worry- they'll tell YOU! Hahaha.



But seriously- unless you have some really deep seeded, non-Al Gore, media-fabricated, hippie, pseudo-environmental reason to be a vegetarian, just eat meat and run fast.



Also, and I respect Scott Jurek, but he is an ultra marathoner and usually races no faster than 7:00 per mile. That is a highly aerobic pace with no significant draw from iron in the blood. His shorter distance times are pretty soft given the caliber of athlete he is on the extreme endurance level. Not saying his diet has anything to do with that, but it is curious that many ultra-runners are vegan (etc.) and most elite track stars are not.



The benefits of eating vegetables and fruit are vast, no doubt, but they can only be enhanced further by including fresh, quality meat, fish, and eggs in the diet. Why limit the healthful foods you eat just for the sake of saying "I am a vegetarian, or vegan, or raw person (?), or have 87 different food allergies"? That is attention seeking, not performance seeking.




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